Saturday, November 6, 2010

Know About Manchester United Football Club and It's Popularity

The words "Manchester" and "United" surround a pennant featuring a ship in full sail and a devil holding a trident.

Manchester United F.C.

Is An English Professional Football Club

Next game: vs. Manchester City, Nov 10 3:00pm ET
"Manchester United"
 Full name Manchester United Football Club
Nickname(s) The Red Devils
Founded 1878, as Newton Heath LYR F.C.
Ground Old Trafford
(Capacity: 75,957)
Owner Glazer family
Co-chairmen Joel & Avram Glazer
Manager Alex Ferguson
League Premier League
2009–10 Premier League, 2nd
Website Club home page

A red shirt with a white collar and a white stripe on each sleeve. White shorts with a black stripe on either side. Black socks with red tops and white trim.
Home colours
A white shirt with black shoulders and a red pattern on both sleeves. Black shorts with a white stripe on either side. White socks with black tops and red trim.
Away colours
A black shirt with a shallow blue chevron on the chest. Black shorts with a blue stripe on either side. Black socks.
Third colours
Current season
Manchester United Football Club is an English professional football club, based in Old Trafford, Greater Manchester, that plays in the Premier League. Founded as Newton Heath LYR Football Club in 1878, the club changed its name to Manchester United in 1902 and moved to Old Trafford in 1910.

In 1968, under the management of Matt Busby, Manchester United was the first English football club to win the European Cup, ten years after the Munich air disaster that claimed the lives of eight players. Alex Ferguson is the most successful manager in the club's history, having won 26 major honours since he took over in November 1986.

Having won 18 league titles, four League Cups and a record 11 FA Cups, Manchester United is one of the most successful clubs in the history of English football. The club is unique in having won a Premier League, FA Cup and UEFA Champions League Treble, in the 1998–99 season.

Manchester United is one of the wealthiest and most widely supported football teams in the world. The club is said to be worth £1.19 billion, making it the most valuable football club in the world. After being floated on the London Stock Exchange in 1991, the club was purchased by Malcolm Glazer in May 2005 in a deal valuing the club at almost £800 million.


Early years (1878–1945):

refer to caption
A chart showing the progress of Manchester United F.C. through the English football league system from joining as Newton Heath in 1892–93 to 2007–08
Manchester United was formed in 1878 as Newton Heath LYR Football Club by the Carriage and Wagon department of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway depot at Newton Heath. The team initially played games against other departments and rail companies, but by 1888 the club had become a founding member of The Combination, a regional football league. However, following the league's dissolution after just one season, Newton Heath joined the newly formed Football Alliance, which ran for three seasons before being merged with the Football League. This resulted in the club starting the 1892–93 season in the First Division, by which time it had become independent of the rail company and dropped the "LYR" from its name. After just two seasons, the club was relegated to the Second Division.
A black-and-white photograph of a football team lining up before a match. Four players, wearing dark shirts, light shorts and dark socks, are seated. Four more players are standing immediately behind them, and three more are standing on a higher level on the back row. Two men in suits are standing on either side of the players.
The Manchester United team at the start of the 1905–06 season, in which they were runners-up in the Second Division
In January 1902, with debts of £2,670 – equivalent to £210,000 as of 2010 – the club was served with a winding-up order. Captain Harry Stafford found four local businessmen, including John Henry Davies (who became club president), each willing to invest £500 in return for a direct interest in running the club and who subsequently changed the name; on 24 April 1902, Manchester United was officially born. Under Ernest Mangnall, who assumed managerial duties in 1903, the team finished as Second Division runners-up in 1906 and secured promotion to the First Division, which they won in 1908 – the club's first league title. The following season began with victory in the first ever Charity Shield and ended with the club's first FA Cup title. Manchester United won the First Division for the second time in 1911, but at the end of the following season, Mangnall left the club to join Manchester City.

In 1922, three years after the resumption of football following the First World War, the club was relegated to the Second Division, where it remained until regaining promotion in 1925. Relegated again in 1931, Manchester United became a yo-yo club, achieving its all-time lowest position of 20th place in the Second Division in 1934. Following the death of the club's principal benefactor, J. H. Davies, in October 1927, the club's finances deteriorated to the extent that Manchester United would likely have gone bankrupt had it not been for James W. Gibson, who, in December 1931, invested £2,000 and assumed control of the club. In the 1938–39 season, the last year of football before the Second World War, the club finished 14th in the First Division.


A smiling man with dark hair wearing a white, green and blue tracksuit top over a blue shirt. He is holding a washbag under his right arm.
Bryan Robson was the captain of Manchester United for 12 years, longer than any other player.
Following an eighth-place finish in the 1969–70 season and a poor start to the 1970–71 season, Busby was persuaded to temporarily resume managerial duties, and McGuinness returned to his position as reserve team coach. In June 1971, Frank O'Farrell was appointed as manager, but lasted less than 18 months before being replaced by Tommy Docherty in December 1972. Docherty saved Manchester United from relegation that season, only to see them relegated in 1974; by that time the trio of Best, Law, and Charlton had left the club. The team won promotion at the first attempt and reached the FA Cup final in 1976, but were beaten by Southampton. They reached the final again in 1977, beating Liverpool 2–1. Docherty was dismissed shortly afterwards, following the revelation of his affair with the club physiotherapist's wife.

Dave Sexton replaced Docherty as manager in the summer of 1977. Despite major signings, including Joe Jordan, Gordon McQueen, Gary Bailey, and Ray Wilkins, the team failed to achieve any significant results; they finished in the top two in 1979–80 and lost to Arsenal in the 1979 FA Cup Final. Sexton was dismissed in 1981, even though the team won the last seven games under his direction. He was replaced by Ron Atkinson, who immediately broke the British record transfer fee to sign Bryan Robson from West Bromwich Albion. Under Atkinson, Manchester United won the FA Cup twice in three years – in 1983 and 1985. In 1985–86, after 13 wins and two draws in its first 15 matches, the club was favourite to win the league, but finished in fourth place. The following season, with the club in danger of relegation by November, Atkinson was dismissed.

Ferguson years (1986–present):

The torso and head of a grey-haired white man. He is wearing spectacles and a black coat.
Alex Ferguson has been manager of Manchester United since November 1986.
Alex Ferguson and his assistant Archie Knox arrived from Aberdeen on the day of Atkinson's dismissal, and guided the club to an 11th-place finish in the league. Despite a second-place finish in 1987–88, the club was back in 11th place the following season. Reportedly on the verge of being dismissed, victory over Crystal Palace in the 1990 FA Cup Final replay (after a 3–3 draw) saved Ferguson's career. The following season, Manchester United claimed its first Cup Winners' Cup title and competed in the 1991 UEFA Super Cup, beating European Cup holders Red Star Belgrade 1–0 in the final at Old Trafford. A second consecutive League Cup final appearance followed in 1992, in which the team beat Nottingham Forest 1–0 at Wembley. In 1993, the club won its first league title since 1967, and a year later, for the first time since 1957, it won a second consecutive title – alongside the FA Cup – to complete the first "Double" in the club's history.
A white football player with short, dark, greying hair. He is wearing a red shirt, white shorts, white socks and white football boots. He is running and has puffed-out cheeks.
Ryan Giggs is the most decorated player in English football history.
Manchester United's 1998–99 season was the most successful in English club football history as they became the first team to win the Premier League, FA Cup and UEFA Champions League – "The Treble" – in the same season. Losing 1–0 going into injury time in the 1999 UEFA Champions League Final, Teddy Sheringham and Ole Gunnar Solskjær scored late goals to claim a dramatic victory over Bayern Munich, in what is considered one of the greatest comebacks of all time. The club also won the Intercontinental Cup after beating Palmeiras 1–0 in Tokyo. Ferguson was subsequently knighted for his services to football.

 In 2000, Manchester United competed in the inaugural FIFA Club World Championship in Brazil, and won the league again in the 1999–2000 and 2000–01 seasons. The team finished as runners-up in 2001–02, before regaining the title in 2002–03. They won the 2003–04 FA Cup, beating Millwall 3–0 in the final at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff. In the 2005–06 season Manchester United failed to qualify for the knockout phase of the UEFA Champions League for the first time in over a decade, but recovered to secure a second-place league finish and victory over Wigan Athletic in the 2006 Football League Cup Final. The club regained the Premier League in the 2006–07 and 2007–08 seasons, and completed the European double by beating Chelsea 6–5 on penalties in the 2008 UEFA Champions League Final in Moscow's Luzhniki Stadium. Ryan Giggs made a record 759th appearance for the club in this game, overtaking previous record holder Bobby Charlton. In December 2008, the club won the 2008 FIFA Club World Cup and followed this with the 2008–09 Football League Cup, and its third successive Premier League title. That summer, Cristiano Ronaldo was sold to Real Madrid for a world record £80 million. In 2010, Manchester United defeated Aston Villa 2–1 at Wembley to retain the League Cup, its first successful defence of a knockout cup competition.

Crest and colours-

A football crest. In the centre is a shield with a ship in full sail above a red field with three diagonal black lines. Either side of the shield are two stylised roses, separating two scrolls. The upper scroll is red and reads "Manchester United" in black type, while the lower scroll is white with "Football Club" also written in black.
Manchester United badge in the 1960s
The club crest is derived from the Manchester City Council coat of arms, although all that remains of it on the current crest is the ship in full sail. The devil stems from the club's nickname "The Red Devils"; it was included on club programmes and scarves in the 1960s, and incorporated into the club crest in 1970, although the crest was not included on the chest of the shirt until 1971 (unless the team was playing in a Cup Final).
A photograph of the Newton Heath team, taken in 1892, is believed to show the players wearing a red-and-white quartered jerseys and blue shorts. Between 1894–96, the players wore distinctive green and gold jerseys which were replaced in 1896 by white shirts, which were worn with blue shorts. After its name change in 1902, the club colours were changed to red shirts, white shorts, and black socks, which has become the standard Manchester United home kit. Very few changes were made to the kit until 1922 when the club adopted white shirts bearing a deep red "V" around the neck, similar to the shirt worn in the 1909 FA Cup Final. They would remain part of their home kits until 1927. In 1934, players sported cherry and white hooped shirts, but the following season the red shirt was recalled after the club's lowest ever league placing of 20th in the Second Division. The current home kit is a red shirt with a white collar, worn with white shorts and black socks.

The Manchester United away strip has more often than not been a white shirt, black shorts and white socks, but there have been several exceptions. These include the navy blue shirt with silver horizontal pinstripes worn during the 1999–2000 season, and the current away kit which is a white shirt with red and black flashes on the sleeves, with black shorts and white socks. An all-grey away kit worn during the 1995–96 season was dropped after just two games because players claimed to have trouble finding their team-mates against the crowd. In 2001, to celebrate 100 years as "Manchester United", a reversible white/gold away kit was released, although the actual match day shirts were not reversible. The club's third kit is often all-blue, this was most recently the case during the 2008–09 season, to celebrate 40 years since it was worn for the club's first European Cup win in 1968. Exceptions include blue-and-white striped shirts worn during the 1994–96 season, an all black kit worn during the Treble winning season, and white shirts with black-and-red horizontal pinstripes worn between 2003–05. The club's 2008–09 season away kit – a white shirt with blue and red trim, worn with blue shorts and white socks – was used as the club's third kit during the 2009–10 season.


Old Trafford
Theatre of Dreams
A stand of a football stadium. The seats are red, and the words "Manchester United" are written in white seats. The roof of the stand is supported by a cantilever structure. On the lip of the roof, it reads "Old Trafford Manchester".
Location Sir Matt Busby Way,
Old Trafford,
Greater Manchester,
Broke ground 1909
Opened 19 February 1910
Owner Manchester United
Operator Manchester United
Construction cost £90,000 (1909)
Architect Archibald Leitch (1909)
Capacity 75,957 seated
Manchester United (1910–present)
Newton Heath initially played on a field on North Road, close to the railway yard; the original capacity was about 12,000, but club officials deemed the facilities inadequate for a club hoping to join The Football League. Some expansion took place in 1887, and in 1891 Newton Heath used its minimal financial reserves to purchase two grandstands, each able to hold 1,000 spectators. Although attendances were not recorded for many of the earliest matches at North Road, the highest documented attendance was approximately 15,000 for a First Division match against Sunderland on 4 March 1893. A similar attendance was also recorded for a friendly match against Gorton Villa on 5 September 1889.

In June 1893, after the club was evicted from North Road by its owners, Manchester Deans and Canons, who felt it was inappropriate for the club to charge an entry fee to the ground, secretary A. H. Albut procured the use of the Bank Street ground in Clayton. It initially had no stands, by the start of the 1893–94 season, two had been built; one spanning the full length of the pitch on one side and the other behind the goal at the "Bradford end". At the opposite end, the "Clayton end", the ground had been "built up, thousands thus being provided for". Newton Heath's first league match at Bank Street was played against Burnley on 1 September 1893, when 10,000 people saw Alf Farman score a hat-trick, Newton Heath's only goals in a 3–2 win. The remaining stands were completed for the following league game against Nottingham Forest three weeks later. In October 1895, before the visit of Manchester City, the club purchased a 2,000-capacity stand from the Broughton Rangers rugby league club, and put up another stand on the "reserved side" (as distinct from the "popular side"). However, weather restricted the attendance for the Manchester City match to just 12,000.

When the Bank Street ground was temporarily closed by bailiffs in 1902, club captain Harry Stafford raised enough money to pay for the club's next away game at Bristol City and found a temporary ground at Harpurhey for the next reserves game against Padiham. Following financial investment, new club president J.H. Davies paid £500 for the erection of a new 1,000-seat stand at Bank Street. Within four years, the stadium had cover on all four sides, as well as the ability to hold approximately 50,000 spectators, some of whom could watch from the viewing gallery atop the Main Stand.

However, following Manchester United's first league title in 1908 and the FA Cup a year later, it was decided that Bank Street was too restrictive for Davies' ambition; in February 1909, six weeks before the club's first FA Cup title, Old Trafford was named as the home of Manchester United, following the purchase of land for around £60,000. Architect Archibald Leitch was given a budget of £30,000 for construction; original plans called for seating capacity of 100,000, though budget constraints forced a revision to 77,000. The building was constructed by Messrs Brameld and Smith of Manchester. The stadium's record attendance was registered on 25 March 1939, when an FA Cup semi-final between Wolverhampton Wanderers and Grimsby Town drew 76,962 spectators.

Bombing in the Second World War destroyed much of the stadium; the central tunnel in the South Stand was all that remained of that quarter. After the war, the club received compensation from the War Damage Commission in the amount of £22,278. While reconstruction took place, the team played its "home" games at Manchester City's Maine Road ground; Manchester United was charged £5,000 per year, plus a nominal percentage of gate receipts. Later improvements included the addition of roofs, first to the Stretford End and then to the North and East Stands. The roofs were supported by pillars that obstructed many fans' views, and they were eventually replaced with a cantilevered structure. The Stretford End was the last stand to receive a cantilevered roof, completed in time for the 1993–94 season. First used on 25 March 1957 and costing £40,000, four 180-foot (55 m) pylons were erected, each housing 54 individual floodlights. These were dismantled in 1987 and replaced by a lighting system embedded in the roof of each stand, which remains in use today.

The Taylor Report's requirement for an all-seater stadium lowered capacity at Old Trafford to around 44,000 by 1993. In 1995, the North Stand was redeveloped into three tiers, restoring capacity to approximately 55,000. At the end of the 1998–99 season, second tiers were added to the East and West Stands, raising capacity to around 67,000, and between July 2005 and May 2006, 8,000 more seats were added via second tiers in the north-west and north-east quadrants. Part of the new seating was used for the first time on 26 March 2006, when an attendance of 69,070 became a new Premier League record. The record was pushed steadily upwards before reaching its peak on 31 March 2007, when 76,098 spectators saw Manchester United beat Blackburn Rovers 4–1, with just 114 seats (0.15 percent of the total capacity of 76,212) unoccupied. In 2009, reorganisation of the seating resulted in a reduction of capacity by 255 to 75,957.


In an initial five-year deal worth £500,000, Sharp Electronics became the club's first shirt sponsor at the beginning of the 1982–83 season, a relationship that lasted until the end of the 1999–2000 season, when Vodafone agreed a four-year, £30 million deal. Vodafone agreed to pay £36 million to extend the deal by four years, but after two seasons triggered a break clause in order to concentrate on its sponsorship of the Champions League

To commence at the start of the 2006–07 season, American insurance corporation AIG agreed a four-year £56.5 million deal which in September 2006 became the most valuable in the world. At the beginning of the 2010–11 season, American reinsurance company Aon became the club's principal sponsor in a four-year deal reputed to be worth approximately £80 million, making it the most lucrative shirt sponsorship deal in football history.

The club's first kit manufacturer was Umbro, until a five-year deal was agreed with Admiral Sportswear in 1975. Adidas received the contract in 1980, before Umbro started a second spell in 1992. Umbro's sponsorship lasted for ten years, followed by Nike's record-breaking £302.9 million deal that will last until 2015; 3.8 million replica shirts were sold in the first 22 months with the company. In addition to Nike and Aon, the club also has several lower-level "platinum" sponsors, including Audi and Budweiser.


First-team squad-

As of 26 October 2010
Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

Position Player
1 Netherlands GK Edwin van der Sar
2 England DF Gary Neville (club captain)
3 France DF Patrice Evra
4 England MF Owen Hargreaves
5 England DF Rio Ferdinand
6 England DF Wes Brown
7 England FW Michael Owen
8 Brazil MF Anderson
9 Bulgaria FW Dimitar Berbatov
10 England FW Wayne Rooney
11 Wales MF Ryan Giggs
12 England DF Chris Smalling
13 South Korea MF Park Ji-Sung
14 Mexico FW Javier Hernández
15 Serbia DF Nemanja Vidić (team captain)
16 England MF Michael Carrick
17 Portugal MF Nani
18 England MF Paul Scholes

Position Player
20 Brazil DF Fábio
21 Brazil DF Rafael
22 Republic of Ireland DF John O'Shea
23 Northern Ireland DF Jonny Evans
24 Scotland MF Darren Fletcher
25 Ecuador MF Antonio Valencia
26 France FW Gabriel Obertan
27 Italy FW Federico Macheda
28 Republic of Ireland MF Darron Gibson
29 Poland GK Tomasz Kuszczak
30 Belgium DF Ritchie De Laet
33 Portugal FW Bébé
37 Republic of Ireland MF Robert Brady
40 England GK Ben Amos
42 Norway MF Magnus Eikrem
44 Northern Ireland DF Joe Dudgeon
45 England DF Oliver Gill
49 England MF Ravel Morrison


Manchester United's first trophy was the Manchester Cup, which it won as Newton Heath in 1886. In 1908, the club won its first league title, and won the FA Cup for the first time the following year. In terms of the number of trophies won, Manchester United's most successful decade was the 1990s; the club won five league titles, four FA Cups, one League Cup, five Charity Shields (one shared), one UEFA Champions League, one UEFA Cup Winners' Cup, one UEFA Super Cup and one Intercontinental Cup.

The club currently holds the record for the most FA Cups, with 11, and the record for the most FA Cup Final appearances, with 18. Manchester United and Liverpool have each won a joint-record 18 top-division titles, but Manchester United holds the record for the most Premier League titles (11), and was the first English team to win the European Cup in 1968. The most recent trophy came in August 2010, when the club won the FA Community Shield.

The only major honour that Manchester United has never won is the UEFA Europa League, although the team reached the quarter-finals in 1984–85 and the semi-finals of the competition's precursor tournament, the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup, in 1964–65.

Manchester United Football Club is an English professional football club, based in Old Trafford, Greater Manchester, that plays in the Premier League.

Park Ji-Sung was hoisted shoulder high by his grateful team-mates after his dramatic intervention in injury time saved the day for Manchester United

Manchester United have reportedly upped their interest in potentially acquiring the services of Rangers goalkeeper Allan McGregor.

Park brace downs brave Wolves-

Park Ji Sung
PA Photos
Park Ji Sung grabs a late winner deep into stoppage time
Scoring Summary
Manchester United Wolverhampton Wanderers
Park Ji-Sung (45)Sylvan Ebanks-Blake (66)
Park Ji-Sung (90)
Match Stats

Manchester United Wolverhampton Wanderers
Shots (on Goal) 17(5) 9(3)
Fouls 7 11
Corner Kicks 3 2
Offsides 4 0
Time of Possession 52% 48%
Yellow Cards 1 0
Red Cards 0 0
Saves 2 3
Match Information
Stadium: Old Trafford, England
Attendance: 75,285
Match Time: 15:00 GMT
Referee: Philip Dowd
Manchester United Wolverhampton Wanderers
1 Edwin van der Sar1 Marcus Hahnemann
15 Nemanja Vidic16 Christophe Berra
5 Rio Ferdinand5 Richard Stearman
3 Patrice Evra11 Stephen Ward
6 Wes Brown32 Kevin Foley
24 Darren Fletcher20 Nenad Milijas
22 John O'Shea8 Karl Henry
4 Owen Hargreaves4 David Edwards
13 Park Ji-Sung17 Matthew Jarvis
14 Javier Hernández12 Stephen Hunt
26 Gabriel Obertan29 Kevin Doyle
18 Paul ScholesSteven Fletcher 10
29 Tomasz KuszczakMichael Mancienne 21
23 Jonathan EvansGeorge Elokobi 3
20 FabioSylvan Ebanks-Blake 9
12 Chris SmallingJelle van Damme 2
27 Federico MachedaWayne Hennessey 13
33 BebéSteven Mouyokolo 22
Bebé for Owen Hargreaves (10)Sylvan Ebanks-Blake for Stephen Hunt (64)
Paul Scholes for John O'Shea (74)Michael Mancienne for Nenad Milijas (77)
Federico Macheda for Bebé (75)Steven Fletcher for David Edwards (64)
Yellow Cards
Javier Hernández (82)
· Club Squads: Manchester United | Wolverhampton Wanderers
Updated: November 6, 2010, 7:02 AM GMT
Park Ji-sung struck a stoppage time winner to give Sir Alex Ferguson a perfect 24th anniversary present as Manchester United manager.• Fergie laments Hargreaves injury It was perhaps a fitting way for Ferguson to celebrate his milestone given the number of times his side have snatched victory in such a manner.Mick McCarthy will not be the last manager to thrash about in frustration after United old-boy Sylvan Ebanks-Blake had looked to have snatched a deserved point for his team, cancelling out Park's opener in the first half.However Park's run into the penalty area in the final seconds went unchallenged and he found the bottom corner of the net.But it was not all good news for United, with the future of Owen Hargreaves again under scrutiny after the midfielder lasted just five minutes after starting for the first time since September 2008 before limping off with a hamstring injury.The subject of Hargreaves' fitness has been the subject of debate for a number of weeks now.At one point his Colorado-based surgeon Dr Richard Steadman claimed he was ready to play, only for Ferguson to step in and explain the midfielder had suffered a setback in his recovery programme.Only a week ago, Ferguson suggested he had no idea when Hargreaves would return, so the midfielder's presence in this afternoon's starting line-up was a big shock. His departure was probably less of a surprise.After making a spirited start, the England star signalled to the bench he had a problem following an attempted cross from his right-wing station.Hargreaves tried to continue but it was impossible and he made his way off, first to the touchline, then down the tunnel, a dejected figure, whose career is now thrown into fresh doubt, even though his latest setback is so obviously nothing to do with the dodgy knees that have kept him out for so long.It is quite possible Hargreaves had gone before Fabio Capello, who had made the short trip south from Bolton, had even taken his seat. The introduction of Bebe was an obvious move given the options Ferguson had at his disposal.Yet United's team sheet appeared woefully weak. Just 35 appearances, before today, for their front three, the vast majority of which had come as a substitute.Wolves sensed their opponents were in trouble and once Richard Stearman had bravely blocked a Bebe shot, they pushed forward with intent.Matt Jarvis was a particular threat and if Nemanja Vidic had diverted Nenad Milijas' 20-yard shot just inside, rather than outside, Edwin van der Sar's right-hand post, the stranded Dutchman could not have kept it out.As it was, the game was still level when Darren Fletcher provided the pass of the first half, cutting in from the left before splitting the Wolves defence in two with a brilliant through ball that allowed Park to finish smartly.After a disappointing start to the second period, Wolves finally gained their reward for all their industry when Ebanks-Blake was in the right place to intercept a Milijas shot, turn sharply round Vidic, then drive a fine shot through the legs of Van der Sar.Under such circumstances, the introduction of Paul Scholes was an obvious move, so too that of Federico Macheda as Bebe joined that rare breed of substitutes who have been substituted themselves.Yet the golden chance fell to a Wolves replacement as Steven Fletcher found himself with a clear sight of United's goal following an ill-advised attempted clearance by Vidic.Instead of calmly finding the net, the Scotland international rushed his chance and scooped it over. Wolves thought they would at least be heading home with a point.

From Wikipedia-

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